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ACTION Celebrates Nomination of Dr. Jim Kim to Head the World Bank

ACTION is thrilled with the nomination of Dr. Jim Yong Kim to head the World Bank. Jim Kim possesses a deep commitment to addressing the political, social, and economic barriers to a more equitable and humane world. 

With over two decades of experience serving the poor in developing countries, and with a powerful record of taking life-saving health strategies to scale, Jim Kim is uniquely well suited to lead the World Bank to deliver on its stated mission of lifting people out of poverty. Jim Kim a physician and anthropologist, was co-founder of Partners in Health a non-profit health care organization committed to providing community based health care, which has served more than 2.4 million people around the world.[1] In 2004 Kim directed the World Health Organization's HIV/AIDS department and led the "3x5" initiative, which set the bold target of putting three million people on AIDS anti-retroviral treatment by the end of 2005. Critics said it was impossible to expand treatment to millions of people in only a few years, but Kim maintained, "We need to bring a sense of urgency that matches the devastation of the epidemics that we face."[2] In no small part, because of Kim's early and visionary leadership, 6.6 million people in developing countries now have access to life-saving treatment. 

Kim clearly shares ACTION's vision for global health equity - perhaps the most critical element to achieving the World Bank's mission to reduce global poverty. Kim is also well known for his contributions to fighting tuberculosis, demonstrating that quality, life-saving treatment could be effectively delivered in resource poor settings.

As we approach World TB Day - with proven TB treatment and powerful new tools still under-resourced, and millions still suffering needlessly from a curable disease - ACTION welcomes the opportunity to have such a visionary leader to help tackle the most important challenges of our time.

 


[1] Partners in Health 2011 Annual Report p.4http://parthealth.3cdn.net/283c794b2e83589919_b4m62spy6.pdf

[2] http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/now-archive/mar17/