Nutrition for Growth Accountability Tool

ACTION’s scorecard tracks the ambition and delivery of N4G commitments by the largest government and philanthropic donors and points out what is needed to meet global goals for improved nutrition.

Last Update: August 3, 2016

Following the Funding:  Nutrition for Growth

ACTION’s “Following the Funding: Nutrition for Growth” scorecard rates the ambition of commitments to nutrition-specific and nutrition-sensitive programming made by bilateral, multilateral and private donors at the 2013 Nutrition for Growth Summit, and tracks their disbursements. The version of the scorecard below was updated on August 3, 2016, and includes nutrition-sensitive spending figures drawn from the 2016 Global Nutrition Report. To find out more about the nutrition scorecard and the methodology behind it, go to the About tab.

Click here to download a print-friendly version of the scorecard. Download the full data table that informs this scorecard, with further details on pledges and their delivery.


*The use of the asterisk (*) below indicates an aggregate pledge made across nutrition-specific and -sensitive funding

Nutrition For Growth Pledge
(in USD millions)
Ambition
Pledge Delivery
Road to N4G 2016
Nutrition-
Specific
Nutrition-
Sensitive
Nutrition-
Specific
Nutrition-
Sensitive
Australia
$32
(2013–2017)
$27
(2013–2017)
On track to meet its unambitious 2013 commitments, Australia is encouraged to increase its nutrition-specific spending to AUD 30 million in the 2016–17 financial year, and to AUD 60 million by 2019–2020.
At the 2013 Nutrition for Growth Summit, Australia pledged only an additional USD 12 million over 4 years. With disbursements of USD 17.79m and USD 20.85m (AUD 23.1 million) to nutrition specific in 2013 and 2014 respectively, this unambitious pledge appears to be on track. However, new investments in the next four years are needed to match the priority for nutrition as a health measure set out in the Australian Health for Development Strategy 2015–2020. This strategy recognizes investments in nutrition as crucial to improving health outcomes, and thus should lead to increased resources mobilized for nutrition. Disbursements of USD 74.71m and USD 87.60m for nutrition-sensitive in 2013 and 2014 are in addition to the 2013 N4G commitment by Australia. Measurement of impact of nutrition-sensitive spending is crucial to maximize outcomes and drive progress on global nutrition targets.
Nutrition For Growth Pledge
(in USD millions)
Ambition
Pledge Delivery
Road to N4G 2016
Nutrition-
Specific
Nutrition-
Sensitive
Nutrition-
Specific
Nutrition-
Sensitive
Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation
$492
(2013–2020)
$370.70
(2013–2020)
The Gates Foundation is on track for its nutrition specific commitments but should accelerate disbursement of its nutrition-sensitive pledge. It should also assess the nutrition impact of these investments
Maintaining current levels of nutrition specific spending, USD 83.534m in 2013 and USD 61.70m in 2014 will help the Gates Foundation deliver its nutrition specific pledge by 2020, thus scaling up high impact nutrition interventions. However, we recommend raising the current levels of nutrition sensitive spending (USD 43.50m in 2013 and USD 29.20m in 2014) to improve nutrition outcomes through integrated and cross-sectoral efforts. The new nutrition strategy launched in 2015 with a commitment to double nutrition investments to USD 776.00m over 2015–2020, and the focus on strengthening data is very encouraging. The Foundation can help drive a conversation around nutrition-sensitive agriculture and measurement of impact of nutrition-sensitive interventions, and encourage others to do the same at the 2016–2017 N4G summit.
Nutrition For Growth Pledge
(in USD millions)
Ambition
Pledge Delivery
Road to N4G 2016
Nutrition-
Specific
Nutrition-
Sensitive
Nutrition-
Specific
Nutrition-
Sensitive
Canada
$141
(no timeline)
$0
--
Canada has delivered its investments from the Muskoka initiative. At the 2016–2017 N4G summit, Canada should make a bold new pledge that will help further its leadership on improving the health and nutrition of women and girls.
Canada made no new pledge at the 2013 Nutrition for Growth summit, whilst re-announcing USD 141.00m (CAD 145m) for programming from its Muskoka Initiative. In 2014, Canada pledged an additional CAD 3.5bn over 2015–2020 for improving maternal, newborn, and child health globally, which also encompasses nutrition interventions. Investments of USD 169.350m in 2013 and USD 159.30m in 2014 reflect ongoing support for nutrition. Through the G7, Canada is committed to lifting 500 million people out of hunger and malnutrition by 2030 and has also confirmed support to the momentum of N4G. Through increased and improved nutrition investments, Canada will be able to deliver improved outcomes in reproductive rights and health care for women and girls, and benefit the most vulnerable. This will also further progress on Canada’s Agenda 2030 for International Development. Canada should also leverage its unique position as a key donor for nutrition to catalyze additional pledges from other donors and development partners.
Nutrition For Growth Pledge
(in USD millions)
Ambition
Pledge Delivery
Road to N4G 2016
Nutrition-
Specific
Nutrition-
Sensitive
Nutrition-
Specific
Nutrition-
Sensitive
Children’s Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF)
$793
(2013–2020)
*
--
CIFF is encouraged to increase nutrition spending to at least USD 120m per year for the remaining duration of the pledge. It is also encouraged to mobilize new resources for nutrition to accelerate progress towards the global nutrition targets.
At current levels of spending (USD 37.48m in 2013, and USD 26.75m in 2014) CIFF is likely to fall behind its 2013 Nutrition for Growth commitments. An ambitious nutrition strategy released in 2014 with a focus on achieving significant reductions in stunting and wasting requires more rapid disbursements for nutrition programming to help meet its set objectives. CIFF fulfilled its pledge to develop a new catalytic financing facility, the Power of Nutrition, which has made its first USD 20m investment for improving nutrition in Tanzania in 2015. As a 2013 co-host for the N4G summit, CIFF is encouraged to rapidly disburse its existing pledge, and make further ambitious commitments at the 2016–2017 N4G summit.
Nutrition For Growth Pledge
(in USD millions)
Ambition
Pledge Delivery
Road to N4G 2016
Nutrition-
Specific
Nutrition-
Sensitive
Nutrition-
Specific
Nutrition-
Sensitive
European Union
$533
(2014–2020)
$4,032
(2014–2020)
The EU should pledge an additional EUR 1bn to nutrition-specific interventions for the period 2016–2020.
The EU pledged a hugely significant EUR 3.50bn to nutrition over 2014-2020, of which USD 442.00m (EUR 340m) was additional to baseline spending for nutrition-specific interventions. With nutrition-specific disbursements having increased from 2013 (USD 47.25m) to 2014 (USD 110.36m), the EU is now on track for its N4G 2013 nutrition-specific pledge, but the EU will have to maintain higher spending levels to be able to meet its pledge. Nutrition-sensitive disbursements of USD 184.48m in development and USD 345.93m in humanitarian aid for nutrition in 2013 and USD 570.89m in 2014 are encouraging, but they need to be increased slightly to meet the 2013 nutrition-sensitive commitments. It is suggested that the EU makes a meaningful contribution to improving nutrition outcomes and meeting the WHA targets through increased investments in nutrition-specific interventions over its existing commitments. The EU’s spending on nutrition-specific programs still remains very low as a share of its development assistance, which is currently at 0.60% of EU ODA.
Nutrition For Growth Pledge
(in USD millions)
Ambition
Pledge Delivery
Road to N4G 2016
Nutrition-
Specific
Nutrition-
Sensitive
Nutrition-
Specific
Nutrition-
Sensitive
France
See
analysis
--
France should further increase nutrition investments, and a starting point would be to commit EUR 500m in new investments over 5 years (2016–2020), which includes EUR 200m for nutrition-specific interventions.
Lacking any financial targets, France’s N4G pledge was weak. Although nutrition-specific disbursements have increased from USD 2.61m (2013) to USD 6.00m (2014), these are not comparable to the level of investments required to tackle the scale of global malnutrition and are too low to meet internationally agreed nutrition targets. Nutrition-sensitive investments of USD 33.60m in 2013 need to be increased significantly to improve nutrition impact. France did not report nutrition-sensitive funding for 2014, indicating a need for improved methodology and accountability systems for nutrition. At the start of 2015 the Ministry of Foreign Affairs began developing a nutrition roadmap to improve accountability and integration of nutrition in development policy, which will be launched at the end of 2016. Unfortunately, this plan is not linked to any financial commitment, but the 2016–2017 N4G summit presents an opportunity to launch this roadmap with adequate finances to help achieve set objectives.
Nutrition For Growth Pledge
(in USD millions)
Ambition
Pledge Delivery
Road to N4G 2016
Nutrition-
Specific
Nutrition-
Sensitive
Nutrition-
Specific
Nutrition-
Sensitive
Germany
$293
(2013 – 2020)
*
While Germany is on track to deliver its aggregated pledge, to keep pace with global ambition, it should commit an additional EUR 300m over 2016–2020; of which EUR 100m should be invested in nutrition-specific programs.
Germany committed to a total of USD 260m (EUR 200m) additional funding for nutrition‐specific and nutrition-sensitive interventions from 2013–2020, alongside committing to focus on women’s empowerment, partnerships with business, science and foundations. It also committed to create a transparently monitored framework for food and nutrition security, but there has not been any update on this and the monitoring process. Nutrition-specific disbursements of USD 35.67m (2013) and USD 50.57m (2014), with nutrition-sensitive disbursements of USD 20.642m (2013) and USD 51.55m (2014), are above the average needed to deliver Germany’s pledge. Additionally, under the “One World, No Hunger” initiative, Germany announced an impressive EUR 1.5bn a year to fight hunger by 2030. Stronger accountability for these investments would help accelerate positive outcomes in tackling hunger and malnutrition.
Nutrition For Growth Pledge
(in USD millions)
Ambition
Pledge Delivery
Road to N4G 2016
Nutrition-
Specific
Nutrition-
Sensitive
Nutrition-
Specific
Nutrition-
Sensitive
Ireland
$169
(EUR 130)
(2013 – 2020)
*
Ireland should use the opportunity of the 2016–2017 N4G summit to publish its timetable and action plan until 2020. On track for its 2013 commitments, Ireland should reinforce its support for this issue through a new ambitious commitment, particularly around nutrition-sensitive programs. This would be in line with its intent and demonstrated leadership to contribute to reducing global hunger and undernutrition.
Ireland pledged USD 169m (EUR 130m) for nutrition‐specific and -sensitive programs without specifying the breakdown for each on top of a 2010 baseline of USD 42m (EUR 32m). Ireland disbursed USD 10.78m in 2013 and EUR 15.00m in 2014 on nutrition-specific programs. Nutrition-sensitive investments equaled USD 48.33m in 2013 and EUR 44.00m in 2014. This level of investment is well ahead of the annual average needed to deliver its overall 2013 commitments, though disaggregated progress ratings are not possible. Ireland continues to meet its target of spending at least 20 percent of all ODA on hunger, and prioritizing addressing hunger and maternal, infant, and child undernutrition, with a particular focus on the first 1,000 days. Ireland is encouraged to make a further commitment at the 2016–2017 N4G summit, to both, nutrition-specific and -sensitive programs, so as to demonstrate continued support for reducing global hunger and undernutrition.
Nutrition For Growth Pledge
(in USD millions)
Ambition
Pledge Delivery
Road to N4G 2016
Nutrition-
Specific
Nutrition-
Sensitive
Nutrition-
Specific
Nutrition-
Sensitive
Japan
See
analysis
--
--
As a member of the International Committee for N4G, Japan should make a bold commitment of USD 1bn to nutrition over 2016–2020, and outline clear measures of accountability for these investments.
In 2013, Japan pledged USD 500m in health ODA from 2013 to 2017. This commitment lapses in the coming year. It also committed USD 100m through the World Bank, including assistance to address undernutrition. Japan disbursed USD 109.29m in 2013 and USD 60.53m in 2014 to nutrition. A progress rating is not possible due to lack of clarity in the original pledge. Civil society in Japan is calling on the government to double its annual spending on nutrition from baseline 2013 figures, to a total of USD 1.0bn during 2016–2020, and adopt the SUN accountability framework in tracking nutrition-specific and -sensitive investments to improve accountability for its investments. At the 2016 G7 summit in Japan, member states released their “Vision for Action on Food Security and Nutrition,” which includes recognition of a 2016 N4G summit as an important opportunity to advance the global nutrition agenda and to fulfill the “Elmau” target of lifting 500 million out of hunger and malnutrition by 2030. Japan must now show its commitment to this issue by announcing a bold financial pledge towards tackling malnutrition. In August 2016, Japan will announce a new commitment to food security and nutrition initiatives in African countries at the Tokyo International Conference on African Development. This announcement will demonstrate Japan's commitment to the issue; but must come with an accompanying financial pledge.
Nutrition For Growth Pledge
(in USD millions)
Ambition
Pledge Delivery
Road to N4G 2016
Nutrition-
Specific
Nutrition-
Sensitive
Nutrition-
Specific
Nutrition-
Sensitive
The Netherlands
$195
(2013–2020)
$195
(2013–2020)
The Netherlands should provide an update on progress against its commitments to nutrition, including the recent announcement of additional EUR 5m per year. It should also provide an update on the implementation of its 2014 food and nutrition security strategy, and report the impact of nutrition investments.
The Netherlands disbursed USD 20.13m (2013) and USD 25.03m (2014) to nutrition-specific programs. Investments in nutrition-sensitive programs marginally decreased from USD 21.62m in 2013 to USD 18.27m in 2014. The pledge to increase nutrition spending by an additional EUR 5m per year is very encouraging. The rates of nutrition-specific and -sensitive disbursements will have to increase to deliver its overall commitments. The Netherlands should now provide an update on actual disbursements and their impact, as well as how it plans to further implement the 2014 food and nutrition security strategy. Furthermore, it should leverage its position as an important nutrition donor to increase international spending on nutrition.
Nutrition For Growth Pledge
(in USD millions)
Ambition
Pledge Delivery
Road to N4G 2016
Nutrition-
Specific
Nutrition-
Sensitive
Nutrition-
Specific
Nutrition-
Sensitive
Norway
No
pledge
--
Norway should make an ambitious commitment of NOK 100 at N4G in 2016–2017, to deliver success on its wider commitment to the health of women and children, education, and gender issues.
Norway did not make a pledge at N4G 2013. It disbursed only USD 0.66m to nutrition in 2013, and USD 0.81m to basic nutrition in 2014; a very small fraction of its total ODA disbursements in both years. Norway has signaled an interest in advancing maternal, newborn, and child health via USD 600m investments in the Global Financing Facility for RMNCAH. A natural complement to this work would be a pledge to increase bilateral investments in nutrition for women and children. Nutrition investment is a missing link in Norway’s strong engagement in global health and education. To address this, civil society is calling for high-level political leadership to attend the 2016–2017 N4G summit and make a bold financial pledge.
Nutrition For Growth Pledge
(in USD millions)
Ambition
Pledge Delivery
Road to N4G 2016
Nutrition-
Specific
Nutrition-
Sensitive
Nutrition-
Specific
Nutrition-
Sensitive
United Kingdom
$1,304
(2013–2020)
$3,244
(2013–2020)
The UK should increase nutrition-specific spending and continue its legacy in tackling malnutrition and commit GBP 530m (USD 750m) in new investments at the 2016–2017 N4G summit. Of these, GBP 375m are suggested for allocation to nutrition-specific investments and GBP 155m for nutrition-sensitive programs.
The UK committed an additional USD 572m in bilateral aid and USD 427m in matched funding for nutrition-specific, over 2010 baseline levels. To date, the UK through DfID has disbursed USD 105.00m (2013) and USD 87m (2014) for nutrition-specific programs. Additionally, GBP 225m have been unlocked from the GBP 280m matched fund; this includes the setting up of the “Power of Nutrition” catalytic fund. Nutrition-sensitive spending totaled USD 734.70m (2013) and USD 780.50m (2014)— above the annual average required to deliver its 2013 pledge. The UK must assess and report the impact of its large scale nutrition-sensitive investments to improve effectiveness. The UK must increase nutrition-specific investments and release its new nutrition position paper to guide its investments. Civil society welcomes the UK’s support to the August 2016 media event with Brazil and Japan in Rio de Janeiro to sustain the momentum for N4G. the UK's continued leadership and commitment on nutrition can be demonstrated through a bold new financial and policy pledge. This will also help drive progress on its ambitious commitment to improve nutrition for 50 million people by 2020 and encourage new donors and governments to make commitments for nutrition.
Nutrition For Growth Pledge
(in USD millions)
Ambition
Pledge Delivery
Road to N4G 2016
Nutrition-
Specific
Nutrition-
Sensitive
Nutrition-
Specific
Nutrition-
Sensitive
United States
$1,096
(2012–2014)
$8,919
(2012–2014)
The U.S. should play a leadership in N4G in 2016–2017 by making a multi-year commitment to significantly increase nutrition funding and setting ambitious 2020 targets for stunting, wasting, anemia, and breastfeeding.
The U.S. N4G pledge included no new money for nutrition, and its commitments ran only up to 2014. The fulfillment of the commitment of USD 475m match funding to the Global Agriculture and Food Security Program and the June 2016 release of the U.S. Government Global Nutrition Coordination Plan for 2016–2021 are steps in the right direction. Additionally, the 2015 Feed the Future Progress Report finds substantial declines in stunting rates in some focus countries, and it projects achievement of a 20 percent reduction in stunting in its zones of influence. However, based on current methodology and reported funding levels, it’s clear that nutrition-specific spending of USD 311.11m (2013) and USD 263.24m (2014) are insufficient to deliver the US’s pledge commitments. Nutrition-sensitive disbursements of USD 2220.12m (2013) and USD 2619.90m (2014) are also insufficient to fulfill the pledge. As the largest donor to nutrition funding, the U.S. leadership will be critical for the future N4G success.
Nutrition For Growth Pledge
(in USD millions)
Ambition
Pledge Delivery
Road to N4G 2016
Nutrition-
Specific
Nutrition-
Sensitive
Nutrition-
Specific
Nutrition-
Sensitive
World Bank Group
$600
(2013–2014)
$0
--
The World Bank should continue the positive efforts on nutrition. In light of the massive financial gap, civil society call on the Bank to step up to increase its nutrition-specific spending to USD 450m per year during 2016–2020, and assess the impact of all the projects in its nutrition-sensitive portfolio.
The World Bank reported disbursements of USD 355.39m between July 2013 and June 2015. Though this seems short of its commitment to spend USD 600.00m in 2013-2014, a recent revision of the methodology for identifying nutrition-specific spending across the Bank’s investments has narrowed the scope and definition for nutrition-specific investments. Under the current methodology, the Bank’s 2013 commitments would not have been classified as entirely nutrition-specific. However, overall nutrition spending has been growing steadily. The Bank has achieved its target of increasing by more than 50 percent technical and analytical support to countries with high burdens of stunting, and has introduced stunting as a Tier 1 indicator on the World Bank Group Corporate Scorecard, thus institutionalizing it as a measure of development progress. We commend the Bank on its assessment of nutrition sensitivity of its entire agricultural pipeline, and welcome steps taken towards improving nutrition alignment in other nutrition-sensitive projects. Measurement and reporting on the impact of nutrition-sensitive projects on improving nutrition outcomes will help guide future priorities. Building on recent progress, the Bank is encouraged to further increase nutrition-specific investments to maximize impact on nutrition and early childhood development outcomes.

To find out more about the nutrition scorecard and the methodology behind it, go to the About tab.

Click here to download a print-friendly version of the scorecard. Download the full data table that informs this scorecard, with further details on pledges and their delivery.