Nutrition for Growth Accountability Tool

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Last Update: August 3, 2016

In 2012, the World Health Assembly endorsed global targets to improve maternal and child nutrition by 2025—an ambitious vision now reflected in the Sustainable Development Goals. The 2013 Nutrition for Growth (N4G) event—where donors pledged US $4.15 billion for nutrition-specific and $19 billion for nutrition-sensitive programs—was an essential step on the long-neglected road to support country-owned efforts to improve child nutrition.

ACTION’s scorecard tracks the ambition and delivery of N4G commitments, providing a baseline measurement for future pledge delivery and a progress report for donors who set earlier deadlines. Consistent and accessible reporting is essential for tracking to be accurate and meaningful. While these commitments are critical to meeting global targets, they are indicators for global progress rather than an exhaustive list of funding.

In 2016, the World Bank, Results for Development, and 1000 Days conducted a study which reported it would cost an average annual investment of $7 billion over the next ten years to achieve four out of the six global targets, in addition to current levels of spending.[1] This financial gap must be bridged by national governments, donors, and other stakeholders/mechanisms.

Overall, it’s clear that donors must meet existing commitments and also considerably increase nutrition investments to meet globally agreed targets.


[1] Shekar M et al. (2016). Investing in Nutrition: The Foundation for Development. Retrieved from http://thousanddays.org/resource/investing-in-nutrition/
*The use of the asterisk (*) below indicates an aggregate pledge made across nutrition-specific and -sensitive funding

Nutrition For Growth Pledge
(in USD millions)
Ambition
Pledge Delivery
Road to N4G 2016
Nutrition-
Specific
Nutrition-
Sensitive
Nutrition-
Specific
Nutrition-
Sensitive
Australia
$32
(2013–2017)
$27
(2013–2017)
On track to meet its unambitious 2013 commitments, Australia is encouraged to increase its nutrition-specific spending to AUD 30 million in the 2016–17 financial year, and to AUD 60 million by 2019–2020.
At the 2013 Nutrition for Growth Summit, Australia pledged only an additional USD 12 million over 4 years. With disbursements of USD 17.79m and USD 20.85m (AUD 23.1 million) to nutrition specific in 2013 and 2014 respectively, this unambitious pledge appears to be on track. However, new investments in the next four years are needed to match the priority for nutrition as a health measure set out in the Australian Health for Development Strategy 2015–2020. This strategy recognizes investments in nutrition as crucial to improving health outcomes, and thus should lead to increased resources mobilized for nutrition. Disbursements of USD 74.71m and USD 87.60m for nutrition-sensitive in 2013 and 2014 are in addition to the 2013 N4G commitment by Australia. Measurement of impact of nutrition-sensitive spending is crucial to maximize outcomes and drive progress on global nutrition targets.
Nutrition For Growth Pledge
(in USD millions)
Ambition
Pledge Delivery
Road to N4G 2016
Nutrition-
Specific
Nutrition-
Sensitive
Nutrition-
Specific
Nutrition-
Sensitive
Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation
$492
(2013–2020)
$370.70
(2013–2020)
The Gates Foundation is on track for its nutrition specific commitments but should accelerate disbursement of its nutrition-sensitive pledge. It should also assess the nutrition impact of these investments
Maintaining current levels of nutrition specific spending, USD 83.534m in 2013 and USD 61.70m in 2014 will help the Gates Foundation deliver its nutrition specific pledge by 2020, thus scaling up high impact nutrition interventions. However, we recommend raising the current levels of nutrition sensitive spending (USD 43.50m in 2013 and USD 29.20m in 2014) to improve nutrition outcomes through integrated and cross-sectoral efforts. The new nutrition strategy launched in 2015 with a commitment to double nutrition investments to USD 776.00m over 2015–2020, and the focus on strengthening data is very encouraging. The Foundation can help drive a conversation around nutrition-sensitive agriculture and measurement of impact of nutrition-sensitive interventions, and encourage others to do the same at the 2016–2017 N4G summit.

Other N4G scorecard downloads:

A downloadable version of the latest version (August 2016) of “Following the Funding: Nutrition for Growth.” The full data table that informs this scorecard, with further details on pledges and their delivery.
N4G scorecard (September 2015)
N4G scorecard (April 2015)

Notes on Methodology

This scorecard lists a subset of N4G donors. A full list of donors and their commitments can be found in the N4G Executive Summary.

Nutrition For Growth Pledge: All Nutrition for Growth commitments, as well as calculations of increased commitments above baseline levels are from the N4G Executive Summary. Nutrition-specific and nutrition-sensitive definitions are also taken from this summary.

Ambition: Criteria considered in assessing ambition of individual N4G pledges included:

Ambition ratings were assigned using these criteria as follows:

The one ambition rating not matching this criteria is the World Bank Group given the large monetary value of their commitment.

Nutrition for Growth Pledges: Data on pledges were taken from the Nutrition for Growth Commitments: Executive summary.

2013 Pledge Delivery: Data on disbursements is taken from the 2015 Global Nutrition Report for donors who reported their own spending via this resource. Those not reported in the Global Nutrition Report are taken from the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development Query Wizard for International Development Statistics and are represented in current US dollars. This methodology is in line with the SUN Donor Network Methodology and Guidance Note to Track Global Investments in Nutrition. Pledge delivery analysis is based on an assumed constant annual rate of disbursement over each donor’s stated pledge period, with a 10 percent margin of error allowed in judging on-time delivery.

2014 Pledge Delivery: Data on disbursements is taken from the 2016 Global Nutrition Report for donors who reported their own spending. For the EU and for donors where self-reported data was unavailable, disbursement data is taken from the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development Query Wizard for International Development Statistics and are represented in US dollars (except for Ireland, where the donor agency reported spending in EUR only) in constant 2013 prices. Similar to the 2013 analyses, pledge delivery is assessed based on an assumed constant rate of disbursement over each donor’s stated pledge period, with a 10 percent margin of error allowed in judging on-time delivery.